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  • How to get a wider butterfly

    Just wondering - are there any streches/exercises I could do to make my butterfly wider?

    EDIT: I'm aware there are a ton of threads on stretching, but do any of you have and stretches that specifically make your butterfly wider? I'm very flexible, but I think my butterfly could be wider that it is. Thanks
    Last edited by bigbadcapitalist; 04-04-2007, 11:25 AM.

  • #2
    There's probably a dozen or more threads on stretching.

    Some are pretty good.

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    • #3
      If your real focus is on covering more low net, challenging out an additional 6 inches will do that in far less time, with much less chance of injury... It also gives you the advantage of covering more net everywhere else.

      You don't need a wide butterfly - see Roy, Giguere, etc...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by rhanz View Post
        If your real focus is on covering more low net, challenging out an additional 6 inches will do that in far less time, with much less chance of injury... It also gives you the advantage of covering more net everywhere else.

        You don't need a wide butterfly - see Roy, Giguere, etc...
        +10

        Also if you want to put rebounds in the slot, a wide BF is a good idea, if you want to put rebounds to the corners, a narrower BF is better.
        Want faster recoveries? Wide BF again not so good.
        The only advantage to a wide BF is in screen or low deflection situations, but even then you will likely have a rebound to deal with and solid positioning would be more effective.

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        • #5
          Hockey Lab Japan : article10
          good site

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          • #6
            Who's got links to Mont's vids? There's a stretch in there that has helped me with some width on my butterfly.

            I guess as with most stretching, simply work at the movement you want more flexibility with. Put your pads on while your watching TV or reading and work on your butterfly. Heck, you don't even need your pads on to do it on carpet, or a cushion. Make sure it's your hips you'r working on....don't force anything in the knees the wrong way.

            Fiddling with how you set up your pads and physically move into a butterfly can help too. If you can try it in front of a mirror, you might see something to improve your butterfly.

            Mine's come a long way since I returned to the game a few seasons to go, but I'm always working on improving it more!

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            • #8
              A good thing to do is strap your bottom half on in your house, put on your gloves and go in to a room with carpet. Go in the butterfly, and keep pulling your legs out to the point where you can feel a slight pull and hold it for 20-30 seconds.

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              • #9
                I had a question since we are on the subject. Everyone says to warm up before stretching What is a good way to warm up? Excercise bike, jumping jacks, jump rope? How long should you do it for?

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                • #10
                  Originally posted by Shu View Post
                  No, it's not. Those stretches can potentially cause real damage.

                  Do *not* do them, unless you're working with a coach or another instructor (yoga?) to improve your flexibility, and they recommend them.

                  I doubt you'll find a coach or instructor that will recommend those stretches, though.

                  I know this sounds a little arrogant and condescending, and I'm sorry for that. I just don't want to see anyone get hurt due to lack of knowledge, so I'm not going to do my usual thing of "generally not a good idea" or "in my opinion" or anything of that nature. Those stretches can DAMAGE you. Do not do them without professional supervision.

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                  • #11
                    I'll throw out my disclaimer first: Not wanting to start an argument.

                    I'm just curious to as if you are speaking from experience that they are dangerous or you have some proof to as to what you say. Are you a doctor or physical trainer? Give more info and help us out.

                    I know that anything involving the human body, if done incorrectly, can be damaging. I have a narrow (non existent more like it) butterfly and I am wanting to widen it. I only want stretches that are befenficial and won't cause me pain and keep me from playing at all.

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                    • #12
                      Do a search

                      I'm not an expert on stretching, but the hockey lab japan stuff has been brought up many, many times on this board, and people with much more knowledge than I have have all universally stated that the exercises are dangerous. The stretches on the hockey lab japan site put a *ton* of pressure on the knees, especially laterally. They're risky.

                      At any rate, I'd say any program to increase flexibility has risks associated with it, and should be done under the supervision of someone actually *qualified* to develop a flexibility program.

                      Now, having said that, if someone goes and decides to do those exercises anyway, that's their choice. I just want people to be aware that there *is* a risk involved with that type of stretching, and not just think it's a good exercise because they saw it on a website. I'd really hate to hear about someone getting hurt because they thought something was safe when it just wasn't.

                      The bigger point, to me, is that a wider butterfly isn't even really necessary. Movement, positioning, and tracking the puck will gain you far, far more than a wider butterfly. As I said before, challenging an extra 6" out will likely gain you more low net coverage than increasing your butterfly flare.

                      And, as spider pointed out, there are some disadvantages to a wide butterfly as well, in terms of mobility, balance, and recovery.

                      Too much emphasis is placed on doing the splits and having a really wide butterfly. Yeah, it's cool to brag about, but really strong fundamentals will help your game a lot more.
                      Last edited by rhanz; 04-05-2007, 12:02 PM.

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                      • #13
                        All I gotta say is... Good post rhanz, very insighful.

                        Last night was a good (or bad, depends on how you look at it) example for me. There were, I think two instances where, if I had a wider butterfly, I would have made the save. But most goals, after much analysis and beating myself up, realized that I over commited or didn't track the puck well. I had a horrible game, let in 7.

                        The majority were shot thats were thrown toward the front from the corner. I would "think" that they would go across the crease to the guy waiting back door. I would slide over to cover the post. Somebody in front, my guy or theirs would knock the puck down in front. I would be so out of position and easy tap in for the other team into the open net. A wider butterfly is definately not going to prevent those.
                        Last edited by jbrown414; 04-05-2007, 01:45 PM.

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                        • #14
                          Originally posted by jbrown414 View Post
                          I would "think" that they would go across the crease to the guy waiting back door. I would slide over to cover the post. Somebody in front, my guy or theirs would knock the puck down in front. I would be so out of position and easy tap in for the other team into the open net. A wider butterlfy is definately not going to prevent those.
                          Yeah, that happens to me a lot too, being so eager to slide across for that spectacular cross-crease stop. Looks great when the puck goes across as expected and we make the stop, looks foolish when (more often than not) the puck stops in front or even worse, outright deflects into the open net as we watch helplessly while sliding by merrily. Gotta learn to properly anticipate those and not overcommit to any one puck path.

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                          • #15
                            The videos are best seen here:

                            YouTube - Mont Sherar - No shots allowed



                            They will help prevent injury -not cause them. And you will have the longest(widest), flattest laterals of anyone in your league by doing them

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