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Player vs. Goalie Skates

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  • Player vs. Goalie Skates

    Hey - need some advice, hope someone can help

    I've played goalie in ball hockey for about 7 years - I'm quite good so I'd like to start ice hockey for a bit of a challenge. I played intramural ice hockey at university about 5 or 6 years ago (so I had only been playing ball for a couple years). I didn't have goalie skates, so I tried with players skates and it was terrible (we lost 8-0 lol). I had a ton of difficulty moving laterally. Not sure if it was the skates, or because I'm used to moving laterally with my feet, or because I'm just really bad at skating.

    I know I'm not a strong skater, but if I have great technical goalie skills, will it be difficult to pick up ice hockey? Will it make a huge difference if I wear goalie skates than when I wore player skates? I hear you have better balance, but is it so much better that I will play a lot better?

    I want to play ice hockey, but I don't want to make a fool out of myself - and it's difficult to find women's rec leagues, so I'd have to play in a fairly competitive league.

    What are the main differences in player/goalie skates? If there is not much difference, can I play in the player skates?

    Sorry for the length! Thanks for any help

  • #2
    I am gonna give a simple, short answer to this out of pure laziness but if you have more specific questions ill chime in

    First, you CAN play in player skates but is it practical and made for that, now. Its like wearing roller skates for inline. Its possible just not smart if you wanna play well

    2nd, there are some KEY design features that make a goalie skate
    -The blade, length, shape, curve
    -The boot, player skates have more ankle support, goalie skates have less for more mobility
    -The skate height, goalie skates with these features allows you to have what is called an attack angle, which is not possible with player skates,
    -Cowling, first puck you take off your boot, and it does happen, youll find out quick why a cowling needed

    It comes down to mobility and protection you simply can not get with player skates. Yes i have seen some old school goalies wear it, not sure why but its not practical

    that ended up bening semi long winded but leet me know what your questions are

    Comment


    • #3
      The core abilities you have as a ball goalie will transfer over, but what you have to remember is that technique means nothing if you can't move. The most important thing for a goalie is to be able to put yourself into position.

      I'm very good at dek hockey. The last season I played(Couple years ago) ended up with a 0.43 GAA. I can skate...okay, but it's clearly the weakest part of my game for roller and ice. Moving is the most important skill you can have as a goalie, so for ice, skating is paramount.

      There are certainly some nuances that may not be obvious, some are, about the differences between ball and ice hockey. For the most part, I'd say it'll certainly take you a while to get acclimated and transitioned. It's best to try and find open hockey to really see for yourself before you throw down any cash on a league where you're letting up 8+ every night. Unless you don't mind that, but it seems like you do.

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      • #4
        Having goalie skates is pretty much a necessity if you want to have powerful pushes and stops, not to mention the cowling protection they offer. In order to get the benefits from using goalie skates, however, you need to actually know how to move on the ice without just shuffling everywhere.

        If you're serious about changing over to ice hockey, you should get a pair of (used?) goalie skates--it's a lot easier to learn the trade if you use the right tools.

        Comment


        • #5
          Let me just say this ~ I joined a team with a brand new goalie who just wanted to try out the position (I was playing out). She didn't want to spend a lot of money, so she made due with what she could scrounge up...including wearing a SKATER chestguard for a couple games...this was before my time or I would have put the kibosh on it immediately, but her husband saw the bruises and she was wearing a new one pretty quick.

          Anyway, she forged ahead with player skates. Now, she is a fantastic defenseman but had a real hard time in net with her mobility.

          Once I realized she was in player skates I insisted she try my goalie skates, even though they were half a size too small. Even with the pain of being a little too small she called it a "revelation" in net. She ended up not buying her own because she got her proper goalie friend to join the team a game or 2 later (she played 100% stand up due to her knees...we were losing by double digits every game and she was done with playing goalie). But she told me she'd definitely buy a used pair if she had planned to continue.

          Anecdotal evidence aside, I find that I can explain all the differences in a goalie vs a player skate to people who want to try goaltending, but they just "don't get it" until they've tried it in a goalie skate.

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          • #6
            Two important things I would like to mention. Firstly goalie skates will make a big difference for your lateral movement and balance. The distance of the boot from the ice as well as the flatter blade all help with your movement. Secondly if you really want to be a goalie but say skating is your weakest skill work on that as much as possible. Being a good skater will improve your balance, power, and a sense of your edges is hugely important. I always did every skating drill the players did because I believe the goalie should be one of the best skaters on the team.

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            • #7
              Thanks for the info - so a follow up: If I am working on skating, either by going to rinks myself and practicing or taking a power skating class - should I be practicing in goalie skates or player skates?

              Just wondering if it would be more beneficial to do everything in goalie skates, or if it would be too difficult doing all the drills.

              I want to challenge myself by playing ice hockey - but it's difficult to find beginner like things or goalie camps for someone my age, and I don't want to jump right into competitive leagues so trying to learn it on my own (hopefully I have a head start being a solid ball hockey goalie) - your help is much appreciated

              Comment


              • #8
                For what my info is worth I would do all your practicing and skating in goalie skates if that's what you are going to wear to play. Skating is very different between the two and constantly transitioning between the two will most likely cause more problems than you are fixing by practicing. My advice would be to look for a decent pair of used goalie skates and try to practice in them as much as possible.

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                • #9
                  Pick up some good used goalie skates or borrow some. You'll have a much more pleasant experience. Getting up and down in player skates is a lot of extra work that's unnecessary.

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                  • #10
                    Cant really say much more then what was said already....Goalie skates are for Goalies, and Player skates are for Players....for all the reason(s) mentioned above!

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                    • #11
                      There must be a reason companys spend millions to make skates specifically for goalies...

                      Use the right tool for the job.

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                      • #12
                        I know goalie skates would obviously be better.

                        I guess moreso I'm wondering if the difference is massive - aka was the reason I played so bad because I played in player skates, and if I wear goalie skates will it make so much of a difference that I will actually be significantly better?

                        It's not like I can't skate, I can - just not the best skater. My biggest problem in player skates was moving laterally, and from what I've read above goalie skates make that much more simpler - although I'm not sure why, I can see it helping with balance, but not sure how it helps lateral movement.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by murj22 View Post
                          I know goalie skates would obviously be better.

                          I guess moreso I'm wondering if the difference is massive - aka was the reason I played so bad because I played in player skates, and if I wear goalie skates will it make so much of a difference that I will actually be significantly better?

                          It's not like I can't skate, I can - just not the best skater. My biggest problem in player skates was moving laterally, and from what I've read above goalie skates make that much more simpler - although I'm not sure why, I can see it helping with balance, but not sure how it helps lateral movement.
                          Angle of attack.

                          Your skates have to be at a greater angle, lets say err... The One80 Goalie Skates have an angle of attack at 38 degrees (Correct if wrong), and because of the length of the player skates (Including the blade holder), you'll need a higher angle of attack (Lets say 50 degrees)

                          Might not seem like much, but put it this way. If your skates had an angle of attack too much, you have to have your legs higher to properly push. The lower it is, you can push from a lower angle, and from the higher angle.

                          I'm not good at explaining. :P

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            as someone who actually started out in player skates as a beginning goalie and someone who was not the best skater at the time, I can say for a fac tthat they DO help.

                            Be honest with yourself. If you are expecting to put skates on and it work miracles, it aint gonna happen. While the goalies skates help, there is nto THAT much of a difference if you cannot skate properly.

                            Skating "around the rink" is not going to help you learn to move "properly" as a goalie.

                            It is two different types of skating, hence the difference in design between player skates and goalie skates.

                            If you try moving around the crease as a "normal player" would, player skates or goalie skates, you are not going to get around very well and will probably wind up on your rear.

                            To move around a goal crease the two most utilized movements on skates are C-cuts" and "T-pushes". Now if the "around the rink" wasnt literall and THAT is what you are working on, then yes, the goalie skates are gonna help with that (because angle of attack, which was mentioned above).

                            In the past, the goalie was the weakest skater. In todays game, the goalie pretty much needs to be the strongest skater to be good.

                            As someone else said, no matter how good your fundamentals are, at some point your going to have to move/not move because you are in/out of position. Moving laterally is more about technique than it is about the skates. True, you will have to lift your leg higher and possibly open up more to get the same power since you don't have the same angle, but ultimately the skates are not going to make THAT much of a difference. As someone else said, pick up a used pair if you can and try them.

                            Around here at a play it again you can get a used pair of goalie skates for about $30. Should be affordable for ALMOST any budget.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I did a quick skim at the responses in this thread and I'm terribly surprised that people have not mentioned safety as the more important issue in using player skates in goal. I would not worry about performance so much as protection in goalie skates over player skates.

                              So if nothing else, I would not worry so much about your improved goalie-relative movement and abilities, but be more concerned about not breaking your foot. The extra cowling over goalie skates certainly will not make you invincible, but I would assume it is definitely better than wearing nothing but player skates.

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