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Good Insoles For Standing on Feet All Day

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  • Good Insoles For Standing on Feet All Day

    I just got a job at a VERY busy pharmacy as a technician where I basically have to stand for my entire shift, unless I get a break. The dress code is business casual - slacks, button down shirt, tie, and dress shoes.

    I have a pair of dress shoes and a pair of loafers that I wore this week, and at the end of the day my feet are hurting so bad that I don't want to do anything else but lay down forever.

    The shoes have never bothered me before, but then again I never had to stand in them for over 8 hours at a time.

    I know guys use different insoles for skates here, but I'm looking for people who have been in a situation like mine and what their solution was.

  • #2
    Your employer should get you guys those Ortho-mats. They are a life saver for your joints and especially your back.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Puckstopper30 View Post
      Your employer should get you guys those Ortho-mats. They are a life saver for your joints and especially your back.
      I guess those would be nice but we're constantly walking around as well. For the hour it'll probably be about 40 minutes standing and 20 minutes of walking back and forth from customer to medication or wherever.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Jon45189 View Post
        I guess those would be nice but we're constantly walking around as well. For the hour it'll probably be about 40 minutes standing and 20 minutes of walking back and forth from customer to medication or wherever.

        The walking is most likely not your problem, it is the standing that is killing you. Why don't you ask to sample some of the ortho products at the pharmacy.

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        • #5
          I'm guessing you need arch supports more than cushy insoles.

          Make sure you get a FIRM product, not just a spongy one. (if you can smoosh it with your fingers, it's not strong enough to support your entire weight on your foot!)

          Some of them have little clips that you can use to adjust the amount of support, too, based on your foot's needs.

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          • #6
            While loafers may be comfortable, they are probably lacking in foot support in the arches. The dress shoes probably don't have enough padding. You can go to a nursing supply shoe store and get shoes meant for standing on your feet all day.
            You might also need a good pair of orthotics (ask a podiatrist). I like to wear ECCO shoes which support and pad my feet all day. I'm sure if you go to a walking shoe store they can help you out.

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            • #7
              Check out Superfeet. Superfeet Premium Insoles

              My buddy is a mailman, and said he buy the best shoes he can find, the puts Superfeet in them and that does the trick.

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              • #8
                In light of everyone here recommending insoles and orthotics, I'm probably going to sound like a kook, but I'll throw my .02 in anyway...

                I think you should try strengthening your feet a little bit. If you're used to walking around in shoes all the time, the muscles and soft tissue in your feet are probably fairly weak, and most likely contribute to your foot soreness. Walking around barefoot at home, in the yard, or even going for some barefoot walks (or in footwear like water shoes or anything with basically no support) can start to wake those muscles up. Scrunching a towel with your toes can also help work those muscles. Once your feet are stronger, you'd probably find that a flatter, lighter shoe is more comfortable not only for your feet, but for your entire body due to the more natural posture. Anything with a raised heel on it can take its toll over time.

                For the record, yes, I am one of those barefoot and minimalist shoe runner types. I screwed around all last year with running shoes, supportive insoles, and finally orthotics to help me run without crushing my shins. I also had lots of back soreness as well. It wasn't until I ditched the heavy, raised heeled shoes and started wearing less shoe (in some cases, no shoes) that the problems started going away. My shins are no longer a problem running (due to improved form through barefoot running), and my back is much happier, whether I'm barefoot or in flatter shoes. I think people would be surprised what the body can do without extra "help."

                I don't expect anyone to go to the extremes some do and get rid of their shoes, but there are better alternatives than adding more and more beneath the foot. Some time spent barefoot at home, even on short, regular walks can be a big help, as can other exercises. Any shoe with little to no difference in height between the forefoot and heel is a good start. The best shoe is something with little/no heel drop, is flexible, and has a wide toe box to allow the toes to move. Arch support is NOT necessary (the arch is its own arch support believe it or not), especially if the time is spent to properly strengthen the foot.

                But that's just my opinion. I expect to be met with a fair share of people that disagree with that idea, I just hope everybody keeps it civil (tend to get flamed on running forums for supporting these theories). But hey, if orthotics and insoles make you happy, that's cool too.
                Last edited by Phantom; 10-22-2010, 06:18 PM.

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                • #9
                  I'm Asian, so I don't wear shoes inside my house and I wear flip-flops most of the time.

                  I don't think it's my foot strength that's the problem. I've trained and coached all day camps where my feet weren't this sore. I've only ever had a sore back once from training/running and that's when I first started to get serious with hockey. I've had sore backs from lifting before, but not that big of a deal.

                  The soreness is mostly in the heels of my feet, if that has anything to do with anyone's input. I'm gonna ask my co-workers and see if they have the same problem and what they did. Then, I'll check out some of the in-sole suggestions you guys gave.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Jon45189 View Post
                    The soreness is mostly in the heels of my feet, if that has anything to do with anyone's input. I'm gonna ask my co-workers and see if they have the same problem and what they did. Then, I'll check out some of the in-sole suggestions you guys gave.
                    The heels comment made me think of tightness issues related to your Achilles tendon.

                    Since you work in a pharmacy already, use your employee discount and grab yourself an ankle brace and wear it to bed (you don't need to wear it while awake). The idea is to keep your ankle at a 90-degree angle so the Achilles tendon doesn't tighten up overnight. (When you sleep on your back, your toes are kind of pointed from the weight of the blanket; when you sleep on your stomach, the mattress pushes your foot into this same pointed-toe position.)

                    Try that for a week and see if you notice a difference from the braced foot to the unbraced foot. If it does help, get another brace and do both feet every night and you don't need $400 orthotics for your shoes!

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                    • #11
                      If you put your foot into a brace every night, won't the muscle atrophy a little?
                      Instead of orthotics, if you could wear Birkenstock like shoes, the cork bed would mould to your feet, like an orthotic, once it got broken in. If you have problems with Achille's tendonitis, try inserting a heel lift in the back of your shoes.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by icehockeyaf96 View Post
                        If you put your foot into a brace every night, won't the muscle atrophy a little?
                        Instead of orthotics, if you could wear Birkenstock like shoes, the cork bed would mould to your feet, like an orthotic, once it got broken in. If you have problems with Achille's tendonitis, try inserting a heel lift in the back of your shoes.
                        I think the idea with the ankle brace is that it will help keep the Achilles stretched to its natural length. Raised heels on shoes (and lift inserts) can actually shorten the Achilles over time, especially if the person doesn't do a lot of barefoot activities or wear flat shoes on a regular basis.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Phantom View Post
                          I think the idea with the ankle brace is that it will help keep the Achilles stretched to its natural length. Raised heels on shoes (and lift inserts) can actually shorten the Achilles over time, especially if the person doesn't do a lot of barefoot activities or wear flat shoes on a regular basis.
                          Exactly, Phantom.

                          The overnight foot brace is not going to cause atrophy in just a few hours' time.

                          And the idea of using "heel lifts" is completely backwards from what needs to be done.

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                          • #14
                            I actually am in the same situation as you. I work at my family's grocery store as a cashier and stock person, so I am standing all day as well. The store is quite old, and the floor is tile with only concrete beneath it, so it is definitely not forgiving on the body.

                            I already wear insoles for every day walking/activity. I have a problem with the ball of my foot so I had a Gait scan for custom fit orthotics. I get a new scan every few years to get them refurbished and changed if my feet change at all. The thing that sucks is they don't help one bit to relieve the soreness I get in my knees and back after all day working. I don't have dress code, and I wear the most comfortable shoes I have, but they don't help. The only way I am less sore is if I do more stocking than checking out, I guess it's the standing that's the killer.

                            The weird thing is, I don't have to wear my orthotics when I play hockey, my feet are just fine in my skates.

                            I would suggest trying insoles you can find in the store. Maybe after a little while on the job you'll be used to standing all day. Good luck!

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                            • #15
                              Isn't the Dr. Scholl's display within fifteen feet of every pharmacy counter in America? They even have the fancy "foot reading" machine to tell you what insole to buy. Not an ad, just an observation, since I have to walk around that thing just to get to the counter at my pharmacy.

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