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Bot Help? Comcast Says I Have a Bot.

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  • Bot Help? Comcast Says I Have a Bot.

    I got an email from Comcast that they had detected a bot on my system. Nothing shocking anymore, but I think Comcast is just pushing some new Comcast anti-virus crap on me with this.

    Can I have a bot?

    I have Comcast internet at my house. I have a home computer that has been turned off for a few weeks. Both wife and I use our iphones at home using the wifi there. My wife does not use Comcast email. I do.

    I occasionally bring my work laptop home and use it there.

    So where do I start looking for the bot? Home computer? Work one? iPhone?

    I think the iPhone update would handle any crap it might have.

    No kidding, my home computer has been off for weeks. Not idle, off.

    Work one I'll give to the IT department as it's not my computer.

    Did I miss anything? Anyone else with Comcast get that message too?

  • #2
    It is very very very easy to get software installed onto a phone or computer without you realizing it. When I say very, I really mean a high school kid with a little time on his hands and a desire to learn or hack can figure it out.

    I guess this depends on how they define a "bot". Are they saying there is some malicious software running on one of your computers?

    Have you called comcast to verify that the email is legitimate? I would call them first and ask them what they suggest. Ask them if they can give you an ip address, MAC address, or computer name where the bot is running (this may help you, us, or someone identify the machine running the "bot". Also ask if they can tell you the name or any information about the "bot".

    Here is a free online scanner that works well, run it on your computer:
    Free ESET Online Antivirus Scanner

    It's also very possible that your phone(s) are infected. This falls out of my expertise so I cannot be of much assistance for removing things from iPhones. I would never count on the manufacturer fixing the issue or remove the malicious software.

    I have comcast, have had malicious software installed before, and I've never seen such a message. My first guess is that it's a fake email trying to get you to download something that really is malicious.

    Comment


    • #3
      Here, try this:
      Attached Files

      Comment


      • #4
        That i know of BOTs are not destructive programs or entities. Most BOTs exist for search engines and forum to provide you with information that pertain to what you are most interested in and looking for.

        Example: GSBB Admins can allow a google BOT to search the web and post threads on the forum that may interest the forum members in order to uincrease traffic through the forum.

        Facebook is full of unseen BOTs that post the ads and people you may know side bar information for you

        Comment


        • #5
          Funny, I thought the same with the fake email. I deleted with no worries until I got an automated call on my cell phone this morning saying the same. Again, like the email, it said to contact Comcast for help.

          When I went to the comcast page for bots, it had this Comcast Safety Sheild thing it wanted me to install. Reminded me of previous Comcast anti-virus crap they tried to give you before.

          Comcast sucks anyway, so I figured this was more suck-age.

          Plus, the dolphin says I'm cool.

          Comment


          • #6
            Got wifi and is it an open network?

            If so a neighbor might be on your network.

            Also, do you have VoIP phone service with someone other than Comcast? If you do I bet they are flagging that and will kill your service unless you get Comcast VoIP. Seen it happen.

            Comment


            • #7
              What? Like a home phone? What's that? ha ha. No phones in house other than cell phones.

              Neighbor... interesting. Maybe I'll turn off the wi-fi when we're not around. Shake off the possible freebe fleas.

              Running the ESET program now. I'll update the iPhones too. Can't hurt right?

              My oldest kid just started kindergarten this year. So odd to say "we don't have a home phone" to people.

              Comment


              • #8
                Rename your wireless network to "Keep your fat *** off my interwebz, you bastahd!!!" and they'll get the idea.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Funny, while sitting in traffic on I-95 in Chester, one of the wifi networks that popped up was named "**** you".

                  I stream Sirius/XM on my phone while driving.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Matt The Hammer View Post
                    What? Like a home phone? What's that? ha ha. No phones in house other than cell phones.

                    Neighbor... interesting. Maybe I'll turn off the wi-fi when we're not around. Shake off the possible freebe fleas.

                    Running the ESET program now. I'll update the iPhones too. Can't hurt right?

                    My oldest kid just started kindergarten this year. So odd to say "we don't have a home phone" to people.
                    Or you could just set a network key for your network. You could also make it crazy like my Dad and it make it all 36? random characters a-f & numbers 0-9...Pain in the *** entering it in.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Well, no, Bots aren't harmless. If your computer is running one, it is part of a distributed supercomputer can can then be used in denial-of-service attacks against web sites or other online services. You need to secure your computers against this sort of abuse.

                      It's probably your home computer: how would Comcast know about your work computer?

                      Computers must only be run behind firewalls; firewall policies should be to close traffic of all types unless there's a legitimate reason (email, web surfing, chat, SL) to open one up.

                      These things are not easy to get rid of without expert knowledge, and you can't trust places like Geek Squad any more. The online services are even worse; some have been known to hold your files for ransom.

                      You can secure your WiFi router in a couple of ways. First, turn off the router name broadcast. That means you have to know the name of the router to connect to it; it won't automagically show up in everyone's list. Second, use the latest encryption scheme. Write the name of the router and its password on a white board in the kitchen where anyone in the house and your guests can see it; them you can trust. (Right?) How to do this depends on the router; they're all different. There's probably a web server built into it that lets you control it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        False Bot Email Tonight? - Comcast Help and Support Forums

                        see if that helps. it honestly sounds kind of scammy, and I'm sure they are getting kickbacks from norton or whoever the crappy antivirus they are pushing.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 1more View Post
                          False Bot Email Tonight? - Comcast Help and Support Forums

                          see if that helps. it honestly sounds kind of scammy, and I'm sure they are getting kickbacks from norton or whoever the crappy antivirus they are pushing.
                          Makes sense. Figured so much. I mean, Comcast really wanted to help me? ha ha hahah too funnay.

                          Thanks for the link. Exactly what I needed.

                          TIMBER - funny enough, I set up my network when I first bought my house 7+ years ago. I have not touched it since. Honestly have no clue where the paperwork is for the router. Set a password? I wish.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Timberwoof View Post
                            Well, no, Bots aren't harmless. If your computer is running one, it is part of a distributed supercomputer can can then be used in denial-of-service attacks against web sites or other online services. You need to secure your computers against this sort of abuse.

                            It's probably your home computer: how would Comcast know about your work computer?

                            Computers must only be run behind firewalls; firewall policies should be to close traffic of all types unless there's a legitimate reason (email, web surfing, chat, SL) to open one up.

                            These things are not easy to get rid of without expert knowledge, and you can't trust places like Geek Squad any more. The online services are even worse; some have been known to hold your files for ransom.

                            You can secure your WiFi router in a couple of ways. First, turn off the router name broadcast. That means you have to know the name of the router to connect to it; it won't automagically show up in everyone's list. Second, use the latest encryption scheme. Write the name of the router and its password on a white board in the kitchen where anyone in the house and your guests can see it; them you can trust. (Right?) How to do this depends on the router; they're all different. There's probably a web server built into it that lets you control it.
                            I don't want to quote your whole post, but you can do that? I have my network WPA2 Protected, ( I believe it is WPA 2, it is the highest one it had, and I have a good, very good I think Linksys/Cisco router. ) But it still displays the network name, it just shows it as protected. But it isn't a name like "Joe Johnson's network". It is just a phrase.

                            But you can actually get rid of the......broadcast name I guess I'll call it? So you know it exists, but you have to know it is there and have the correct password to access it? Can you do this through your router settings/192.168.1.1?

                            Thank you Timber. I've said this before, and you still prove it right, you are the smartest guy I know. No one has ever told me that before.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Dude! Don't stroke Timber's ego that way; it will only get bigger.

                              Yes, the setting gets set the same way as ll the others. Look for ESSID, which is where you put the name of your WAP. Near there should be a checkbox called "ESSID Advertise" or some such. Uncheck it.

                              On my Mac's menu bar is an item that represents the wireless connection. If I click that, I get a list of all the WAPs near me … if they advertise their ESSID. Turn that off and your WAP becomes invisible. This is a 99% solution: it gets rid of the 99% of people who are looking for easy wi-fi access. (I have a few IP addresses; I'm thinking of setting one up with a free access point, but bandwidth-limited.)

                              To connect to it, you have to choose "Join Other Network…" or whatever it is on Windows (shudder*) and type the name exactly. Then you put in the password as usual. That's why I suggest writing it down on a sign or white board.

                              * I once held a wireless connectivity workshop at work. Everyone had to bring their laptop. I had all the Mac people up and running in about ten minutes. In the rest of the two hours I got most of the Windows people running. Every one had a different setup and needed individual exploration. Argh!

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