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15 minutes makes a difference between life and death...

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  • 15 minutes makes a difference between life and death...

    hey everyone,

    this past week has kinda been rought for me...
    going to the ahl preseason game was fun and all but the best news came yesterday. My cousin was put in the hospital on saturday because he went into shock from a staff infection...on thursday @ school he was shaking like he was freezing and he had a really bad headache. he didnt come to school on friday and on saturday they walk-in clinic he went to to get test done to find out what was wrong, never called to tell his parents what was wrong...later that night he went into shock...they rushed him to the hospital and got him worked on right away...they found out he had a staff infection and something might be wrong with his apendix. I went to visit him on monday and he was doing alright but he didnt kno how long he would have to b there yet. then when i went to see him yesterday, there were a couple friends from school there playing xbox with him. a few minutes later, the doctors came to do a little operation on him... they had to put this 24" long tube into his arm, through his arm,chest and into the top of his heart so they can pump iv fluid into his bloodstream to kill the bacteria from the staff infection. They said he can probably come home sometime tonight or tomorrow...best news all week. The craziest part of all is, the doctor told his parents,"15 MORE MINUTES AND HE WOULD HAVE BEEN DEAD." Thats a VERY small window of time for someone to be living and dying from. So dont take anything with your body thats wrong lightly...go get it checked out even if you dont think you should, cause u never know when 15 minutes might save ur life...


    goalie35

  • #2
    The truly scary part about that is that there is strains of staph that are resistent to many antibiotics. He isn't out of the woods yet...One of the bosses here has been fighting a staph infection in his knee for months.

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    • #3
      Considering the large amount of bacteria living in our goalie gear, we should always avoid wearing gear over any kind of open cut or sore. It's an infection waiting to happen.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by sloth2946
        The truly scary part about that is that there is strains of staph that are resistent to many antibiotics. He isn't out of the woods yet...One of the bosses here has been fighting a staph infection in his knee for months.
        Not only that, but the most common place to get staph is at a hospital or clinic. My mother had surgery to repair an aneurysm, but the surgical site ended up infected with staph.

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        • #5
          Never take health for granted. My father who is thin, very low cholsterol, and exercises moderately just had a shunt put in as he found out one of hid ateries was 90% blocked.

          He just changed doctors . The new one asked about chest pains and short breath but my father had never suffered either. He did a stress test on him for his records and discovered the blockage. Put him in an ambulance at that moment and sent him for the surgery.

          He is doing ok but was close to a major attack at any moment.

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          • #6
            Just one more reason to CLEAN YOUR GEAR!!!!

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            • #7
              here it comes....................

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              • #8
                I will say that I skated with someone the other day that had a chest protector/and or gear that smelled far worse than yours!

                I could actually stand to stand next to you at the clinic without passing out!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by wortchillergoal
                  Never take health for granted. My father who is thin, very low cholsterol, and exercises moderately just had a shunt put in as he found out one of hid ateries was 90% blocked.

                  He just changed doctors . The new one asked about chest pains and short breath but my father had never suffered either. He did a stress test on him for his records and discovered the blockage. Put him in an ambulance at that moment and sent him for the surgery.

                  He is doing ok but was close to a major attack at any moment.
                  stent not shunt. That should do wonders. Just out of curiousity what type of stent was it? Also during the procedure did they use a drug called reopro?

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                  • #10
                    I don't know which drug he was given. He is feeling better as I type this. His body had started to grow new artery around the blockage which I did not know it could do.

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                    • #11
                      One of the goalies in our league had to have surgery to repair his shoulder. We knew he was going to be out for a couple months, but then came the CLOT in his LUNG!!! He's done for the season, and bloody lucky to be alive.

                      It seems to happen far too often; a guy that used to work for me had an aortic aneurysm. His father died of the same thing years earlier, but he decided to get it fixed. The surgery requires that they relieve the pressure from his vessels, but the plaque in his arteries cut loose. When they restored the circulation, it ended up in his leg, and he lost the leg before he left the hospital.

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                      • #12
                        That's rough man. Life's a scary thing.

                        Derek

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