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Marty's ideas to improve the NHL

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  • Marty's ideas to improve the NHL

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servl...NStory/Sports/

  • #2
    It would seem that Marty has been lurking here. His thoughts have been thrown around here for some time. I like his ideas, though they are mostly this community's.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by sean 38
      Anyone want to copy & paste the story on here? You need to register to read it online.
      the Story:

      From Friday's Globe and Mail

      New Jersey Devils goaltender Martin Brodeur is a member of the NHL's blue-ribbon panel on rules and a member of the team that will represent Canada at the World Cup of Hockey this month. His columns will continue during the World Cup.

      I'm impressed by the steps the National Hockey League is taking to make sure everyone associated with the game gets a say in how to improve it.

      Hearing from players, coaches and management, as well as those from the American Hockey League and junior levels, is the best way to ensure that the integrity of the sport is protected while the product is enhanced.

      It's my feeling that despite the need for some changes to the NHL game, we're not that far away from having a sport that suits everyone's interests.

      While much has been made of the decrease in scoring during recent seasons, the real problem in hockey is the lack of good scoring chances.

      On an average night playing goal for the New Jersey Devils, I face roughly 10 to 12 quality scoring chances over 60 minutes. If the NHL can find a way to ensure most teams are getting 15 to 20 good opportunities a night, it will have come a long way in addressing its problem.

      Making that happen doesn't require an overhaul of the game, only some minor adjustments.

      In the past 20 years, players have become bigger, stronger and better, which has resulted in less room for skating and making plays. With less open ice in which to manoeuvre, players have to fight much harder than they once did just to get a decent chance on goal.

      Consider that a 30-team NHL means few teams can put superstars alongside superstars and it only figures that defensive hockey has gained an advantage.

      Creating more chances, I believe, comes down to creating more skating and flow. The more room players have to skate, the more they will be able to stay in the play and use their skills to create chances.

      Since increasing the size of the ice is impractical in most arenas, the NHL should start by looking at ways to create more space in the zones, through moving the bluelines or widening them.

      Pushing the net closer to the end boards is another idea worth undertaking.

      If we become more of a skating league, the talent is already there to give fans the excitement they crave.

      While there is nothing wrong with a good hit in hockey, there are several things we could do to allow offensive players more freedom on the ice. Put an end to players being hit and pinned behind the play after they have dished off a pass. Permitting such late hits only takes good players out of the play and reduces the flow.

      Another way to improve flow is to strictly enforce interference on players skating without the puck. Allowing players to move freely into the offensive zone for passes will lead to more skating and more scoring chances.

      Keeping the star players fresh and ready to compete at the highest level also can improve the product. While the hurry-up faceoff rule may be great for fans watching in arenas, it takes a toll on top-line players, who are trying to catch their breath between whistles. The result is that many top players are forced to spend more time on the bench or play tired.

      That isn't what fans want.

      Another way to ease the players' fatigue would be to change the NHL schedule.

      I'd love to see an end to interconference games. Aside from the obvious benefits of reducing travel for players and cutting costs for teams, our fans would get to see more of the New York Rangers, Boston Bruins, Toronto Maple Leafs and other teams with whom we have developed good rivalries.

      Shortening training camps and starting the regular season in September is another way to reduce the grind of the schedule. That would allow more off days while eliminating the need for back-to-back games.

      Even though much of the debate about what ails hockey has focused on goaltenders, I believe this is missing the point. Before the league thinks about reducing equipment size or preventing goalies from playing the puck along the boards, it needs to listen to what the men who stand in front of pucks for a living have to say.

      For most of us, it's all about safety. Players are shooting harder today, and the commonly used butterfly style means knees can be exposed if goalies aren't able to use the pads of their choice.

      The minor adjustments needed in today's NHL could all be easily implemented without upsetting the sport. There is no need to change the dynamics of hockey or the skills needed to succeed in this great game. I believe the solutions are all close at hand. The Globe and Mail will make a donation to the Montreal Children's Hospital on behalf of Martin Brodeur.

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      • #4
        HOLY CRAP! We're not the only ones saying it! by golly, we might be right. You don't think that anyone from the NHL offices lurk here do you?

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        • #5
          Amen Martin, Well spoken. Another example of why goalies are the highest form of life.

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          • #6
            Wasn't he a big fan of equipment size reduction? When did he change his mind? Oh yeah, probably when the league went beyond the pads and starting talking about playing the puck. Now he is all about leaving the goalies alone.

            He should be a politician with the way he flip-flops on the issue.

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            • #7
              He missed one rule, the two-line pass. Said rule is perhaps the most idiotic rule to ever be enforced.

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              • #8
                Well, nobody would listen to us on our little BB. Maybe the NHL will care about what their vezina winner has to say. I sure hope they do. The clutching really gets to me. Its really boring.

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                • #9
                  Who cares....its Brodeur.

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                  • #10
                    Do you have to be a knob street?

                    Marty makes the same points tht hav been made here a million time, hopefully someone will listen

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                    • #11
                      That is a very lucid and well thought out article by Brodeur. I commend him for addressing such issues as contraction which no one has the gaul to come up with. Although he doesn't hit that button directly, he insinuates it which is enough. That alone will open the game up, but all his other points are bang on.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by McTrout!
                        Do you have to be a knob street?

                        Yes.

                        And doesnt Marty have a sister in law to bang?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by sloth2946
                          That is a very lucid and well thought out article by Brodeur. I commend him for addressing such issues as contraction which no one has the gaul to come up with. Although he doesn't hit that button directly, he insinuates it which is enough. That alone will open the game up, but all his other points are bang on.
                          I certainly didn't glean that from anything Marty wrote.

                          He did make some great points, though. The NHL needs a paradigm shift in how they look at improving the game. Stay off the goalies for the time being. It isn't the main problem with the game. Maybe some one will listen.

                          ...and yeah, out with the red line. Stupid.

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                          • #14
                            Yep, he knows the game. Good read. He should be commish.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Theif
                              I certainly didn't glean that from anything Marty wrote.
                              Originally written by Martin Brodeur
                              Consider that a 30-team NHL means few teams can put superstars alongside superstars and it only figures that defensive hockey has gained an advantage.
                              The above is no doubt a shot at the fact that the talent pool is too thin.

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