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  • Advice from the Elders

    Hey everybody. I'm in a tough situation, and would like the advice of you all, especially the more experienced/older guys on the board. I'm about to be a freshman at West Virginia University majoring in pharmacy. Pharmacys a pretty tough curriculum, and math and chem are two big chunks of it. Although they aren't my strongpoints, if i work hard i can do well in the classes. My problem is this: I really want to try out and hopefully play for the ice hockey team there. I've seen them in action, and feel that I could play for them in an instant. Plus i train over the summer with guys ranging from Midget AA, to Junior A and B, as well as D1, 2, and 3 college players. Because of the politics that sadly plaugue the sport these days, I can't say that I've played for a top club team, but can say that I started on one of the worst teams in my varsity hs league, and gained tons of experience and skill from the oppurtunity. I know that I can compete with the competition of WVU's team, and my coach believes that as well and said he would write WVU's coach in an instant. My problem is that I cannot afford to lose my focus on my major, and am debating whether or not I should go out for the team or not. Hockey is a part of my life, and something that I thoroughly love to do. All of you older guys that can give me input and advice would really help me out here. I appreciate it a lot.
    Sincerely,
    Joe

  • #2
    It can be done BUT

    If you structure your time between hockey and pharmacy school and forget partying, and other distractions when you are a freshman in college you should be able to do it, BUT you need to be FOCUSED and DETERMINED that you will not let your grades slip!!!! Unfortunately, only you know what the distractions may or will be... I believe that part of college is different for everyone. Some students can go straight from class to workouts and then home to study, but others simply cannot avoid the socializing (which is an important part in growth, but can take over young person's lives when they are out on their own for the first time in their young lives)...

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    • #3
      Go for it ! but remember to organize your time wisely. As 29smoke stated "be disciplined". You don't want to be saying to yourself years from now that you should 've tried out for that hockey team.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: It can be done BUT

        Originally posted by 29smoke
        If you structure your time between hockey and pharmacy school and forget partying, and other distractions when you are a freshman in college you should be able to do it, BUT you need to be FOCUSED and DETERMINED that you will not let your grades slip!!!! Unfortunately, only you know what the distractions may or will be... I believe that part of college is different for everyone. Some students can go straight from class to workouts and then home to study, but others simply cannot avoid the socializing (which is an important part in growth, but can take over young person's lives when they are out on their own for the first time in their young lives)...
        This is sound advice. I would add that like money you will need to budget your time. I suggest you make time for a little social activity in that budget. Sticking to the time allowed will be the hard part.

        I hate to say this but it is an option. You could always try and then stop playing for the team if your studies fall behind. There will be hockey after college. You are taking on what can be a great and rewarding career that will let you play.

        Good Luck and I hope you can do both.

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        • #5
          Shady,

          Shoot me an E-mail and we can talk about this. Pharmacy is very time consuming, and I do not just mean the class work. In addition to the class work, you are going to need to start gaining some pharmacy experience in order to sit for your boards upon graduation. Each state is different as to how many hours you will need to accumulate, but the bottom line is that you need to start gaining hours early so that you don't get jammed at the last minute. Your first year of school will be the best opportunity to play. Your course load will consist of biology, chemistry, physics and calculus. In your first semester will be the intro level courses and the second semester will move into more detailed information. Your second year will mainly focus on Organic Chemistry and anatomy and physiology with some other add on courses like pharmaceutical calculations. Keep in mind that the second year is the year where most Pharmacy Schools lose students. Not a year that I would focus on extracuricular activities. In your third year is where the rubber starts to really hit the road. You will start to get into more disease state management and other related topics.

          I can go on for a while but let me know if you have any questions.

          rx

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          • #6
            Not only am I one of the 'eldest' on the board, but I have been through a similar situation.

            I went to college at a Big Eight (now Big Twelve) school on a wrestling scholorship. My major was Industrial Engineering. The pressure to do well in both was incredible.

            It took me 5 1/2 years to complete my degree requirements due to this funny habit that I had of dropping classes when the going got tough. It got to the point that the Dean of Engineering threatened to revoke my scholorship because in 18 months I had only completed enough credit hours to qualify as a part-time student.

            I eventually buckled down, qualified as a full-time student, and kept my scholorship. The cost was my social life. Between two-a-days and the requirements of an engineering ciriculum, I barely had time for personal hygiene never mind partying.

            Balancing everything out, the demands of NCAA Div. I Wrestling are more intense than any other collegiate level sport. However, from what I understand the Pharmacy ciriculum is as demanding if not more so than engineering. You already have an advantage over me in that you are at least mature enough at this stage in your life to recognize that it is going to be a challenge.

            I cannot say what I think you should do, but would I do it the same way all over again? Probably not. Your college years should be spent killing brain cells while strengthening the ones that survive. For me wrestling and the team became my social life. That may not be what you want out of college. Like you said, there is hockey after college, and probably pick-up during.
            Last edited by Thumper; 07-10-2004, 10:10 PM.

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            • #7
              You might also want to PM Az- he's on campus at WVU as well, though as a graduate student in the English Dept. He also may give you some insight about the WVU hockey program, academic rigors of campus life, etc.

              Personally,

              I went to school on D-I track scholarship. After fall practice, I quit. I hated it, and the rest of my college life was so much more fun.

              I absolutely do not regret continuing to run and compete in track at the D-I level. In fact, I didn't have anything to do with track again until about 7 years after I graduated, when a colleague of mine who works with an inner city youth summer track program, wanted me to come out and help her coach her hurdlers.


              I found out that what I spent time doing with other things, I learned far more about myself and made better long term decisions about what I wanted and where I wanted to go.


              I figured I give the other side of the coin story about dropping out, and the benefits!.

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              • #8
                When it is all said and done, just remember that you can live to play hockey, but you need a job (PharmD) to live.

                If you run into any choices, remember that making choices that allow a good career path through education will also allow you the opportunity to play hockey at will later in life. If I had a dollar for every one of my old buddies that made comments about how hard school was going to be (back when I was becoming an RN) that is still slaving away in a job that they hate because other things (hockey, women, beer) were more important than their eduction, well, I could go buy a bottle of Glenmorangie 1971. As it is, my focus for a few years in school now allows me to make my own schedule and play hockey 5 times a week without even pissing off my lovely wife.

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                • #9
                  It depends how motivated and disciplined you are, and what you want to do with your free time.

                  No matter how tough a curriculum is, if you are bright, there is plenty of time in college to do things besides study. The question is what you want to do with your free time.

                  Some kids spend half the week drunk or hung-over, and still manage to succeed. Others hold down full-time jobs, and still manage to succeed. Like Gophie said, there are a lot of choices, and you learn a lot by trying different things. You only get to go to college once, and it'll probably be the last time in your life that you can do pretty much whatever the heck you feel like doing, whenever the heck you feel like doing it. It always amazes me how kids can't wait to get out of here to "earn the big bucks". I always tell them to enjoy the time here, and they just snicker. A couple of years after graduation, if I run into them, they almost always come around to agree, but they say they didn't know how good they had it back then.

                  Why do you think Frosty is still in school

                  Here at Michigan Tech, there are plenty of examples of varsity athletes who have managed to do quite well in school. Some play D-1 hockey, and still manage to graduate in 4 years with engineering degrees and decent grades. Last year, we had a kid graduate who was All-American (D-II) in basketball, leading the team in scoring and rebounding, and he graduated in 4 years with a double major in mechanical engineering and business, and a 3.95 GPA. Amazing kid.

                  And remember, grades aren't everything. You'll be amazed how many employers will be more impressed with a varsity goaltender with a 2.9 GPA, instead of a geek with a 3.9 that didn't have a life in college.

                  I am also guessing that the AD at WVU has special programs in place to help athletes succeed; tutors, and mandatory study hours, for example. I have to sign a form a couple of times a semester saying if the varsity athletes in my classes have been showing up, and if they are succeeding. If they get bad news on the form, the system kicks in and tries to help them out.

                  And remember, if you don't play varsity hockey, you can probably find decent rentals or intramural sports to keep active. It won't be as competitive, but if you need to blow off a rental to study for a test or finish a project, it won't be the end of the world.

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                  • #10
                    Look towards the future.

                    You want a nice career that pays well and is well respected?

                    You want a career that will afford you the ability to buy nice stuff?

                    What do you need to do this?

                    1. Don't let people talk you into stupid crap like partying and not studying. Roll with people who are serious about thier schoolwork.
                    1a. Those people who want you to party and live like a foo' don't care about you, your future or anything your interested in.

                    2. Be serious, but enjoy yourself. This can be done. Unfortunately i didnt figure this out till i was a junior.

                    3. If you do the hockey thing and the Pharmacy thing, you will be one impressive hombre. A man who really toughed it out.

                    But above all, you ar ethere to get a degree, not a hockey resume. Do every thing in your power to get that degree. Lots of things are going to try to sidetrack you. Focus on what lies ahead.

                    rlm55

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                    • #11
                      My advice is this... simply put:

                      Try it, no one every acheived greatness by following the easy path.


                      Here is my story (abridged version):

                      I worked my way through college by holding two jobs. One steady "full time" and one part time which kept odd hours (firefighter). I was often seen groggy eyed in class not because I was out drinking on thursday night, but because I was covered with ice and frozen to the ground at 3am. It took me longer than 4 years to get through college, and I did not do the "party thing" like all of my friends (as much).

                      However, I emerged with a B/S in Aircraft Engineering Mgnt, work experience in two fields, a great deal of responsibility, and just enough "fun times" to keep college enjoyable.

                      Balance is the key grasshopper.......

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                      • #12
                        Talk to Az, WVU is a big part school (From what i've heard) If you think you can manage practice, and schoolwork w/out being distracted by teh womenz, or beer, or anything else then do it.

                        See:

                        If you structure your time between hockey and pharmacy school and forget partying, and other distractions when you are a freshman in college you should be able to do it, BUT you need to be FOCUSED and DETERMINED that you will not let your grades slip!!!! Unfortunately, only you know what the distractions may or will be... I believe that part of college is different for everyone. Some students can go straight from class to workouts and then home to study, but others simply cannot avoid the socializing (which is an important part in growth, but can take over young person's lives when they are out on their own for the first time in their young lives)...

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                        • #13
                          Stay in school, get a degree and make lots of Money. Hockey will always be there when you're done.

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                          • #14
                            Anyone see this year's gator bowl?

                            Good luck with the organic chemistry, I hear that's a bitch. All I know is the two semesters my girlfriend had organic chem 1 and 2 she might as well have been dating her ochem textbook instead of me!

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by gort
                              All I know is the two semesters my girlfriend had organic chem 1 and 2 she might as well have been dating her ochem textbook instead of me!
                              *** Racer96 is now known as ochem_textbook

                              Mike

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