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  • #16
    I started playing when I was 11. I'm still playing 43 years later. The amount of laughs, friends and great times I would not trade for anything.

    When you are a late teen and asked to go to an open camp in Ontario. You think, "I can be a pro!" Then you see your competition and think, "College, career here I come."

    But the joy of playing. Of walking into a rink. Or that pungent odor. Shooting the crap. Telling lies. Playing pranks. And ragging on each other. That never changes.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by NHLAlum Target View Post
      Luck is when opportunity meets preparation.

      Most people are so under-prepared to meet Mr Opportunity, that they never even know they are in the same zip code, even when they are standing right next to each other.
      AMEN! That has to be one of the most wise remarks to be posted at this site.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by gunleather View Post
        I actually had a mite parent tell me there plan to get there kid to either North Dakota or the University of Minnesota. I told them "Wow all I want for my kid is for him to love the game enuff to still be playing when he's bald & fat." Sure I want him to do his best and play at the highest level he has the ability and desire to, but that's not the most important thing.
        Same here for my kids.

        Funny, I'm 35. I still play baseball. I played like everyone else from T-ball on. Friends came and went who were "going pro" or "playing college". All these kids who's parents locked them away in camps and clinics all stopped playing decades ago. I beg these guys to play again. They all won't. They hate it now.

        But I keep going like you guys for all the same reasons.

        I hope my kids will do the same with whatever hobby they love too.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by gunleather View Post
          I actually had a mite parent tell me there plan to get there kid to either North Dakota or the University of Minnesota. I told them "Wow all I want for my kid is for him to love the game enuff to still be playing when he's bald & fat." Sure I want him to do his best and play at the highest level he has the ability and desire to, but that's not the most important thing.
          .....Enuff?

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          • #20
            Though, I remember growing up and even though I never dreamed of playing in the NHL I had teammates who did. I had teammates who were playing rep A in bantam still thinking they had a shot.

            Yes parents can be pushy, but for some kids playing for fun is just not enough.

            A .4% chance is not a good shot, but if the kid is motivated and dedicated why not go for it?

            It does seem however, for goalies that college hockey is the better route than the OHL (even if you don't make the pros, you still have a degree to fall back on).

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            • #21
              I love the competition, hanging out with a good group and working hard to get better.

              Lifetime gift I'd give to my daughter if had one would be for her to know I loved her and instill enough self respect for her to be her own woman and confident enough to stand up for herself in any situation.

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              • #22
                Trent, you totally beat me to that picture.

                ~Brent

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by unitedturtles26 View Post
                  Though, I remember growing up and even though I never dreamed of playing in the NHL I had teammates who did. I had teammates who were playing rep A in bantam still thinking they had a shot.

                  Yes parents can be pushy, but for some kids playing for fun is just not enough.

                  A .4% chance is not a good shot, but if the kid is motivated and dedicated why not go for it?

                  It does seem however, for goalies that college hockey is the better route than the OHL (even if you don't make the pros, you still have a degree to fall back on).
                  Usa division 1 college hockey for a canadian born player is statistically FAR more rare than playing major junior nowadays.

                  Because of improvements in USA development like the USHL and NAHL D1 rosters see canadians as minorities on their rosters---- check them out online.

                  Unfortunately, the parents who say " if my kid just gets a scholarship I will be happy" will be more than likely disappointed even more.

                  Use hockey as a tool to create a life long love of the sport, keep it fun, take life lessons from the struggle and did i say have fun?

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by keeks2915 View Post
                    Usa division 1 college hockey for a canadian born player is statistically FAR more rare than playing major junior nowadays.

                    Because of improvements in USA development like the USHL and NAHL D1 rosters see canadians as minorities on their rosters---- check them out online.

                    Unfortunately, the parents who say " if my kid just gets a scholarship I will be happy" will be more than likely disappointed even more.

                    Use hockey as a tool to create a life long love of the sport, keep it fun, take life lessons from the struggle and did i say have fun?
                    Change hockey for sports and this is the battle I'm waging with the local soccer program my daughter is in. I'm actually winning I think. They seem to really get the fact that my involvement and instruction of my team is simply about teaching the kids how to work, how to fail, learn from it so that they can succeed and love the sport so that when they get older they still play.

                    I did the same thing with a youth hockey team I coached about 10 years ago....it was quite the compliment when I played against one of my former players, the goalie and he thanked me for teaching him the position and the drills he still uses to work on his game. That was cool.

                    But yes, if you go in to it with realistic expectations as a coach, administrator or parent knowing that none of the kids you're working with will ever get that ride, it makes things easier because the expectations are set properly. Then true learning and fun can be had. You still compete and do so to win, but you're setting more realistic goals.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by sloth2946 View Post
                      Change hockey for sports and this is the battle I'm waging with the local soccer program my daughter is in. I'm actually winning I think. They seem to really get the fact that my involvement and instruction of my team is simply about teaching the kids how to work, how to fail, learn from it so that they can succeed and love the sport so that when they get older they still play.

                      I did the same thing with a youth hockey team I coached about 10 years ago....it was quite the compliment when I played against one of my former players, the goalie and he thanked me for teaching him the position and the drills he still uses to work on his game. That was cool.

                      But yes, if you go in to it with realistic expectations as a coach, administrator or parent knowing that none of the kids you're working with will ever get that ride, it makes things easier because the expectations are set properly. Then true learning and fun can be had. You still compete and do so to win, but you're setting more realistic goals.
                      If your daughter is at the top level in the older years, and one of the better players on the team there is a good chance that she can make a college career out of it. There are as many female college sports teams as there are male sports teams, but less females playing. Say only 1% of female youth soccer players ever play college soccer, that doesn't seem like a lot, but say only 3% try, your odds start to look a lot better.

                      Speaking as an athlete who went through the recruiting process in both hockey and soccer there is a lot more out there than you think, but you have to go for it. You can't wait for the opportunity to come to you.

                      I also think there would be a lot more Canadians in college hockey if it weren't for the OHL/WHL/QMjHL.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by unitedturtles26 View Post
                        If your daughter is at the top level in the older years, and one of the better players on the team there is a good chance that she can make a college career out of it. There are as many female college sports teams as there are male sports teams, but less females playing. Say only 1% of female youth soccer players ever play college soccer, that doesn't seem like a lot, but say only 3% try, your odds start to look a lot better.

                        Speaking as an athlete who went through the recruiting process in both hockey and soccer there is a lot more out there than you think, but you have to go for it. You can't wait for the opportunity to come to you.

                        I also think there would be a lot more Canadians in college hockey if it weren't for the OHL/WHL/QMjHL.
                        My point is this. If she's going to get the ride, SHE'S going to do it. I'll facilitate what I can, but she has to want it and burn for it. HINT: She doesn't and wont. I'm being honest. All I'm trying to do with her is to put her in situations where she learns as many of the life lessons that sports can provide for her and if she's good enough, she will be good enough. If she plays soccer as an adult(after HS..even 'beer league' soccer), I will consider what I'm doing a win for her and it will have made her a better person.

                        That's my end game. I'm hoping she gets the full ride on the grey matter between her ears. To me that would be far better than a sports ride.

                        Too many of the 'gym class hero' people out there who push their kids too hard don't get this idea.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by sloth2946 View Post
                          My point is this. If she's going to get the ride, SHE'S going to do it. I'll facilitate what I can, but she has to want it and burn for it. HINT: She doesn't and wont. I'm being honest. All I'm trying to do with her is to put her in situations where she learns as many of the life lessons that sports can provide for her and if she's good enough, she will be good enough. If she plays soccer as an adult(after HS..even 'beer league' soccer), I will consider what I'm doing a win for her and it will have made her a better person.

                          That's my end game. I'm hoping she gets the full ride on the grey matter between her ears. To me that would be far better than a sports ride.

                          Too many of the 'gym class hero' people out there who push their kids too hard don't get this idea.
                          Which is a very good approach, but I think too many people are quick to shame the parents who push for excellence. Most of the time it's the kid with the dream. Some parents do get too caught up in it, but a lot of the times it's the kid pushing.

                          Also coaching and teaching life lessons for kids is a great approach, but don't assume none of the kids are going to make it to the pros or college level.

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                          • #28
                            If a parent push's for excellence that is also a drawback. It depends on how bad the child wants it. If the child wants it, but the parent wants it more it's easy to see the problem.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by unitedturtles26 View Post
                              ....., but I think too many people are quick to shame the parents who push for excellence....
                              I push for excellence in every thing my kids do. (that includes the kids I coach in hockey & baseball) I'm always telling them to put forth there best effort in whatever they are doing. Sweeping the floor, doing the dishes, taking a math test, fielding a ground ball, taking a faceoff it does not matter what you are doing. Always do whatever you are doing to the best of your ability. I think there is a huge difference in trying to get a kid to do there very best and setting a goal for them that they have almost no chance to achieve. Or pushing them into something the parent wants more then the kid. I was thrilled when my son asked me if he could play goalie. He didn't like it and went back to playing out for a season. This year he decided he really missed tending net so he's back in. I let him develop a passion for the position I didn't force him into it.

                              (wow sloth & I agree on something don't think that's ever happened :-) )
                              Last edited by gunleather; 05-23-2012, 06:46 PM.

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                              • #30
                                I want excellence, and I push for it, in a very subtle fashion. More importantly, I want my daughter, and her teammates to push themselves and each other for excellence. When that happens, it's like freaking magic and anything is possible.

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