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Taking out leather straps for nylon straps with buckles

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  • Taking out leather straps for nylon straps with buckles

    I'm not sure if this is a good idea, but I have a pair of old school Brian's Beast pads, and of course everything is leather other than one strap, being nylon with a buckle. I only use these pads for ball hockey, but find them a pain to put on sometimes, and adjust. I was thinking of taking them to the shop, having all of the leather straps replaced with nylon straps with buckles.

    Would this be a poor idea? I also know it costs a lot more to replace leather straps on a set of pads than nylon. I also intend on keeping the pads for a while, as I use pad covers to keep them in good condition.

    If not, I might just buy a cheaper pair for ball hockey and keep them in their original condition.
    Last edited by Ukrzuel; 03-11-2012, 01:26 AM.

  • #2
    If you want to do it yourself kohomcm showed how to here http://www.goaliestore.com/board/equ...leg-strap.html

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    • #3
      Thank you!

      I'm looking at cutting down the amount of straps too. I have 7 straps per pad, so it takes too long to gear up. I just want to make the perfect fit once, and buckle up! I'll go to the shop tomorrow to get the equipment!

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      • #4
        if you want to trade or sell the leather straps PM me.
        (just got a used pair of pads and many of straps were cut - some too short)

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        • #5
          I would have given them for free, but I used the leather to stitch my nylon onto.

          I've completed the pads, and they're pretty strong!

          I used nylon thread, double threaded, and I sewed them onto the starting pieces of the leather straps. I used a sewing awl to poke the holes, and just a medium sized sharp needle. This is the first "mod" I've ever done, and it was indeed fun!

          I went from 6 straps (including the skate one), to having 3 Nylon, and keeping the skate strap leather. I have the perfect fit set, so I just buckle up 3 times per leg, and I'm done! My perfect fit is having the ankle (bit higher), and calf tight, then leaving the knee strap loose.

          These pads are only for ball hockey anyways, and I play mainly standup.



















          I did go to the shop, and they wanted $60 per pad! ... If I do intend on keeping the pads, I might take it in to get re-stitched, but the current job I did should hold up fine for awhile. I was going to use a rivet to just hold the straps in place on the leather...

          At least it fits great, and only 3 straps!
          Last edited by Ukrzuel; 03-11-2012, 01:29 AM.

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          • #6
            I cannot offer advise on stitching them in, but I have been replacing the leather straps with nylon on my velos for years, for both ball hockey and ice, and I would never go back.

            The only strap I keep leather is the boot strap, which I keep done up and just slip my foot into for ball hockey. On ice I think that strap has too high a likelihood of getting hit with a puck and the plastic clip breaking, thus I left it leather.

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            • #7
              So I tried the pads on for 2 hours in pickup! They held up well, and didn't break regardless of slides, and going down in award angles.

              Three straps is all I put on, other than the leather boot strap.

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              • #8
                Where did you get the nylon straps & clips?

                Just wondering where you picked up the nylon straps and clips. I have been wanting to do that to mine as well. Lighter and easier to get ready.

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                • #9
                  strapworks.com

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                  • #10
                    strapworks.com is where I get them

                    It's too bad you did all that cutting first - the tabs where the buckles attach can be reused, and the straps could have been removed from the seam without cutting.

                    For those thinking of doing this - Just pop the rivit from the buckle tab and remove the metal buckle. You can then just slide the female end of the clip onto the tab. Reconnect the tab using a T-nut and helmet screw.

                    Easy to change back and forth, as well as to replace any broken buckles.

                    For the straps, just cut the seam and take the strap out whole.

                    You can then do one of three things:
                    Sew the seam shut and sew the new straps to the outside of the seam.
                    Sew the new straps into the seam the way they were before.
                    Sew a section of strap with a loop and use the loop to attach the nylon strap with a slide. The loop can also be reused to hold the tab on the leather strap.

                    Slides, Loops & Reducers at Strapworks.com

                    The advantage is that you can switch back and forth if desired.

                    I'll put up a couple pics soon to show what I mean.

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                    • #11
                      OK, pics for those considering this mod:

                      I've already replaced the rivits with screws on these pads, so I have a head start.



                      Remove the rivit, remove the buckle, leaving the tab intact.



                      Add the female end of the clip, add T-nut and screw back together.



                      Leather strap, nylon strap, nylon strap with loop sewn to it, triglide.



                      Nylon strap threaded through loop, secured to itself with triglide.



                      Leather strap threaded through loop.



                      Bazinga!

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                      • #12
                        My son's Itech's came with nylon straps instead of leather (boot strap is still leather). It made perfect sense to me as the fit is the same every time without having to count holes. The only issue we had was the straps would lose adjustment. I used hockey tape (THE duct tape for hockey) to lock them in place once we had the lengths dialed in.

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                        • #13
                          my last pads had straps and buckles on them and i hated it because i took a puck directly to the buckle ONCE and the thing shattered into a hundred pieces. yeah, they're cheap to replace but i can't sew to save my life and, of course, it was the female side that was broken so i would have to unstitch the loop from the pad to replace it.

                          i liked the idea that they would stay in the right place without having to count holes but they're like a timebomb for bad goalies (because i didn't play the puck right and somehow it hit the buckle... had i been any good, i probably could have avoided that).

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                          • #14
                            ^^ jim you make a good point. It seems that a better solution is to use plastic loops sewn to the pad on the female end, and then secure the female connector to those plastic loops using a plastic slide and nylon. I'd guess the loop is much less likely to break than a plastic clip. I've done this before and it would be extremely easy to swap out broken clips without having to do any sewing; all I had to do was sew in the loop & nylon piece to the pad seam.

                            Alternatively, use a metal female connector like bc30 did above, but that comes with a small weight increase.

                            bc30, great pics, nice work!

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                            • #15
                              Another option on the female side is to sew a decent length of nylon strap onto the outside seam, then use a triglide and female buckle. That way if you break one, you simply pulls the strap out of the triglide, slide on a new clip, and reattach.

                              Not a close up picture, but Vortek used that style as standard.



                              I never figured out why some (read Velocity) pads used such a complicated method, or worse, one that involved a major sewing operation to replace a brocken clip.

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