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Homemade Equipment Drying Rack

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  • Homemade Equipment Drying Rack

    Hey all, I figured I'd share my little project that these boards helped inspire me to make. I won't get much into the construction phase of it, but I'd be happy to answer any questions you might have. To provide a little background, for years I had been simply air drying my gear in my garage by removing it from my bag, and just placing it on various boxes I had lying around my garage. It was better than leaving it in the bag, but most times my gear wouldn't completely dry out, and leaving my gear in a cold garage all winter was less-than-ideal.

    Fast forward to a few weeks ago, I went to Home Depot, headed to the plumbing department, and picked up several lengths of 2" PVC Schedule 40 Pipe, 1" PVC Schedule 40, elbows, caps, "T"s, and other various couplings. I brought the pipes home and did "tests" of temporarily hanging my various pieces of gear on them, to determine what would be the best size to properly hold my gear, but not stretch it out over time. Keep in mind that even though I am not providing measurements for equipment drying rack, I measured EVERY piece of gear and made many adjustments along the way in order to create a very compact, but functional rack that was properly sized for all my own equipment.

    Now on to the construction! I started with the base, which I wanted sturdy enough to be able to hold the rack above, and I wanted to create a "landing" area for my pads to be stacked properly, upside-down, but without having them resting on the actual floor (which helps in areas like a dirty garage). Also, I created a cross-bar above where the pads would be resting, so I could create a little pressure to help the pads keep their "S" curve while drying. If you'll notice, in the pictures, there is a little gap between the bottom of my upside-down pad and the cross-bar, only because I measured that area for my new pads which are 3" taller. I also used a 2" PVC section to hold my skates upside down, which fit perfectly in terms of supporting the boot but not stretching them out.

    Moving upward, I added a front and a rear hanging section to hold my chest protector and my pants, without taking up a lot of space. By constructing a very large "T" using elbows, straight pipe, etc., I was able to get the chest protector and pants to hang very naturally, without resorting to a clothes hanger or hook. I am really excited with how the two sides ended up, and the weight of both pieces actually creates a nice counterbalance for the whole rack. This area involved a lot of little cuts and reducers, but it was well worth the time.

    On the top, I created a large center pipe for holding my helmet in place, as well as two "arms" extending out to the sides to hold my glove and blocker. I used a pipe reducer to go from a 2" to a 1" pipe which comfortably fit inside the palm of the glove and blocker without stretching them out. 90% of the entire rack was created using 2" PVC, because I wanted it to be strong enough to support all the gear without having to lean it against something, and I'm really glad I did. The base took the most time to construct, but it's the entire foundation for the stand above and really helps stabilize everything.

    I hope you enjoy the pictures, I took enough so if you wanted to create a rack of your own, you'd be able to replicate my process. As a minor addendum, I actually intended on adding a computer case fan to the upper section of the drying rack so I would be able to flip a switch and blow air through my glove, blocker, and helmet, but I decided against it for the time being. I'm sure it could be done, but I was happy with what I ended up with. Total time was around 6 hours for construction, not including the trips to Home Depot, and the total cost was under $100.











  • #2
    Nice work!

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    • #3
      Looks damn good. The only thing i would suggest for next time is maybe making an outlet that you could hook up a blow dryer to (similar to shock doctors thing) and have the points for skates/glove/bucket open to allow for air to get to those areas. All depends on where you live though. Thing looks great!


      Edit: I was too excited to see the pictures to read the last paragraph
      Last edited by Keeper 86; 01-10-2011, 02:30 PM.

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      • #4
        Very cool. But, every time I see something like this I can't help but think that hanging your C/A up that way is just going to stretch and wear out the elastic much more quickly. I hang my C/A up on a command hook on a wall with a wooden coat hanger that I put under the armpits, where there isn't any elastic.

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        • #5
          I have a similar setup. It needs some tweaking, but it does the job very well. I point heavy duty fan at my gear...and it's dry in a couple hours max.

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          • #6
            c0nquistad0rian, I actually hang my chest protector a little bit differently now (from the photo), because I had the same concern you did. Now, I basically use the top part of the shoulder floater that ties into the back of the chest protector to hang it up. It's not hung on the velcro part at all, it almost looks like it would on a hanger in the store.

            natesdad, I like the setup!

            To go one step further, when I first get home, I run a large fan pointing straight at the ceiling, and I open up my glove and blocker and put them both of top of the fan. At high speed, they dry out very quickly. By the time I jump in the shower and come back downstairs, the glove/blocker are basically dry, so then I move them to the rack and point the large fan at my entire setup. By morning everything is great!

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            • #7
              I also have a boot dryer. It works well for both gloves and skates. I put it on a timer so I dont dry out the gloves too much and make them stiff.

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              • #8
                I'm just curious, why spend 6 hours and around $100, when you could spend $70 including shipping on something like this?



                Currently I am hanging my stuff up in my garage on hooks and it seems to be doing a good enough job, but was considering a rack.

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                • #9
                  what about drilling holes in the tubes even if you are not hooking up a dryer to the tubes...wouldn't holes naturally allow more air to pass through for a more natural drying process? of course, holes could weaken the strength of the tubing.

                  looks great. i may just have to replicate something like this although i have an an idea for once my garage gets cleared out.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bubba17 View Post
                    I'm just curious, why spend 6 hours and around $100, when you could spend $70 including shipping on something like this?

                    Wet Gear 'Goalie' Equipment Organizer

                    Currently I am hanging my stuff up in my garage on hooks and it seems to be doing a good enough job, but was considering a rack.
                    Good question, and there are a few points I considered. One, the goalie rack listed doesn't even store most of the gear vertically, namely the glove, blocker, skates, which would help them dry out properly. Two, it honestly didn't look very sturdy, I'm pretty confident that 2" PVC would hold better over the next 10 years compared to thin pieces of wood. Three, I made my rack so it fits all my gear properly, including the proper sized piping to secure but not overstretch my glove, blocker, and skates, plus the right-sized cross-bar will help keep my pads properly scrunched enough so they can keep that elusive "S" curve.

                    But, mostly importantly, four, where's the fun in ordering something online?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by bubba17 View Post
                      I'm just curious, why spend 6 hours and around $100, when you could spend $70 including shipping on something like this?



                      Currently I am hanging my stuff up in my garage on hooks and it seems to be doing a good enough job, but was considering a rack.
                      well, my first guess is that the one you linked to looks flimsy and the one these guys have made are out of PVC pipe. Probably alot more sturdy, no? i know i had one of those cheapy street hockey franklin goals for my kids, one winter the cheap plastic cracked. got all replacement pvc and used the net, way better. should of just built a pvc street hockey goal for them in the first place.
                      Last edited by apewrench; 01-10-2011, 04:46 PM. Reason: yep, too slow, you beat me to it

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by bubba17 View Post
                        I'm just curious, why spend 6 hours and around $100, when you could spend $70 including shipping on something like this?



                        Currently I am hanging my stuff up in my garage on hooks and it seems to be doing a good enough job, but was considering a rack.
                        Using PVC makes the whole setup more customizable. I made mine wide so my gear isn't crowded and gets plenty of airflow. It also can be broken down easily and moved, if necessary.

                        The OP spent a bit too much on his setup IMO(still impressive nonetheless), I spent about $30-40 bucks on mine. I think his costs escalated because he used some expensive fittings and reducers etc.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by stlgoalie1973 View Post
                          what about drilling holes in the tubes even if you are not hooking up a dryer to the tubes...wouldn't holes naturally allow more air to pass through for a more natural drying process? of course, holes could weaken the strength of the tubing.

                          looks great. i may just have to replicate something like this although i have an an idea for once my garage gets cleared out.
                          Drill holes in the flat bar at on the base, drill holes in all the end caps, and then set it by a furnace duct in your house. No need to buy a specific heater/blower, let your already running furnace/AC provide the air flow!

                          And P.S. Great job on the build, looks great!
                          Last edited by vanniek; 01-10-2011, 05:13 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by vanniek View Post
                            Drill holes in the flat bar at on the base, drill holes in all the end caps, and then set it by a furnace duct in your house. No need to buy a specific heater/blower, let your already running furnace/AC provide the air flow!

                            And P.S. Great job on the build, looks great!

                            Some days I play more than once, so I like my stuff dried quickly. The faster it's dry the less likely to mildew also. The timer is the key...the fan only runs for as long as necessary.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by natesdad View Post
                              Some days I play more than once, so I like my stuff dried quickly. The faster it's dry the less likely to mildew also. The timer is the key...the fan only runs for as long as necessary.
                              I SAID DRILL HOLES!!!!

                              I don't like dry gear, so I wouldn't want any ventilation lol, I was just suggesting the "cheapest" method

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