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Equipment drying rack for dummies!

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  • Equipment drying rack for dummies!

    I've had a bunch of people ask me how to make a drying rack for their gear. First, the photos:







    Next, the parts list:

    20' PVC Sch. 40 pipe (don't cheap out & use the crappy thin wall sprinkler pipe!!)
    1 1-1/2" PVC cross
    3 1-1/2" PVC tee
    4 1-1/2" PVC 90
    7 1-1/2" PVC cap
    4 Brass screw-in hooks
    1 pint PVC glue
    1 pint PVC cleaner


    OK...you need a few measurements.

    1 - Stand your pads up and measure from the floor to the top of the pad. Write this down
    2 - Measure from the highest point of your C/A to the lowest point. Write this down.
    3 - Lay your C/A down & stretch out the arms straight. Measure from wrist to wrist. Write this down.

    Take the measurement for your pads. Add about 5" to that measurement, and cut 2 sections of pipe.

    Take the measurement for your C/A height. Add 12" or so to that measurement, and cut one piece of pipe to that measurement.

    Take the measurement of your C/A armspan. Divide that number by 2. Cut 2 sections of pipe to this measurement.

    Cut 4 sections of pipe approximately 18" long.

    Cut 2 sections of pipe approximately 12" long.

    Cut 3 sections of pipe approximately 6-8" long.

    Quick notes on PVC.
    When you cut the pipe, de-burr the ends. Take all the frayed pieces off the end and make it smooth. I use a box cutter, it makes it easier. When you are ready to glue pipe, wipe any dirt off, then clean the pipe end and the fitting socket with the PVC cleaner. Then apply a thin layer of glue to both the pipe end and the fitting socket. Insert the pipe into the socket, and give it a 1/4 turn twist. HOLD THE PIPE & THE FITTING TOGETHER FOR ABOUT 15 SECONDS! If you don't do this, the pipe can push out of the fitting. Trust me on this...ok?

    Take 2 of the tees. In the ends that run in a straight line, glue the 18" pieces into each socket. In the branch socket, glue the pipe you cut for the pads. You'll have something that looks like a big T now. This part is the legs, and will hold the pads up. Glue caps on the end of the 18" sections of pipe.

    Take 2 90's. Glue a 12" piece of pipe into one socket of each 90.

    Take the 2 pieces you just glued together and the 2 T sections for the legs. On top of the leg pieces, glue a 90 on each one, with the 12" piece of pipe facing perpendicular to the base of the T.

    Take the remaining tee. In the branch fitting that comes out the side, glue in the section of pipe you cut for the C/A height.

    In the branches that run in a straight line, glue the other end of the 12" pipes, with the pipe for the C/A height facing straight up. At this point, the rack should stand on its own, and it should be taking shape nicely.

    Take the cross fitting. In 2 of the sockets, glue the pipes you measured for the arms of the C/A. Obviously, these should extend in a straight line, not on a 90 degree angle to each other.

    In one of the other sockets, glue one of the 6-8" pieces and glue a cap on top of that piece.

    On top of the pipe for the C/A height, glue the remaining socket of the cross.

    Take the 2 remaining 90's. In each one, glue one of the 6-8" pieces and a cap on the pipe. Glue the other end of the 90 onto the end of the pipe for the C/A arms, facing straight up.

    All that is left now is to screw in the hooks!

    Take 2 of the hooks, and screw them about 8" apart in the lower part of the pipe for the C/A height. One of these is for the cup/jock, the other is for the pants.

    Hang the C/A over the top center section. Mark where the elbows hit on the pipe, and screw a hook in the pipe so you can hold the arms out horizontal while it dries.

    The center post, above where the C/A goes over the rack, can be used for your mask. I use something different since I have a few masks, but in my original design that is what this piece is for.

    Voila! You're done! The pipe & fittings should cost you about $25, and can be purchased at any Home Depot, Lowe's, or plumbing supply house. Even if you've never messed with PVC, the whole process should take less than an hour.

    WARNING!! Be very careful with the PVC cleaner and glue!! It will damage most carpet and any vinyl flooring. Work on some kind of cardboard, or out in the garage or driveway. Seriously...unless you want to piss off your wife, be very careful with this stuff. It also can burn your skin & eyes, and kind of stinks. Ideally, you'll do this outside.

    Questions?? Feel free to PM me or e-mail me.

    Good luck!!

  • #2
    Thanks for the AWESOME detailed writeup, on this cool contraption that you made!
    Being that I generally keep my gear in the garage, I'm going to add wheels to mine, so I can wheel it outside for a while each day.
    Thanks again,
    Ben

    Comment


    • #3
      Ant you are a gear whore to end all gear whores but I still love ya man.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by ncgoalie34 View Post
        Ant you are a gear whore to end all gear whores but I still love ya man.
        You'd really say that if you saw the current collection...that's an old pic!!

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        • #5
          Are you somehow insinuating we're all dummies?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by hroark2112 View Post
            You'd really say that if you saw the current collection...that's an old pic!!
            What do you have now. I got 12.8's on the way.

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            • #7
              I got a few sets of Velos, a pair of Vortek gloves...considering selling a pair or two of gloves to get a full set of Vortek VK7s. I do love those gloves!!

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              • #8
                Has anyone tried blowing air through the PVC piping to speed up drying time?

                All one would need to do (I think) is have something to push air up through the main pipe - anything from a surplus hair-dryer to a full Shock Doctor Blower - and a few holes punched in the pipe at crucial points. The gloves would seem to benefit most from this, since the wettest part (the palm) is both least likely to receive air and directly over the ends of the PVC tubing. Then again, it might be horribly inefficient in terms of airflow, and accomplish less than a big floor fan.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Gotta love it you should try selling one on the bay

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                  • #10
                    I keep one of those fairly inexpensive but powerful vortex fans ($20 at Targey) behind it, everything is dry in a day. I've thought about the fan idea...maybe I'll work on it.

                    I'd sell them on Ebay, but I'd rather just give you guys the directions and not have to worry about dealing with Ebay!!

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                    • #11
                      Ant, thanks a ton for posting this. I was looking for this exact thing and couldn't find it.

                      Originally posted by Law Goalie View Post
                      Has anyone tried blowing air through the PVC piping to speed up drying time?
                      I've been trying to figure out how to mount computer fans to the unit to pump air through the holes. Give it another week and I'll have it figured out. (So far, the best idea I've got is modding a funnel at on opening to mount the fan to.)

                      MtA

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                      • #12
                        I've worked out the mechanics of how to do the blower, I'll work on it this week. I've got a blower out of an HVAC unit which will hook up to the piping. I'm thinking of doing it just for the gloves though, maybe gloves & skates.

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                        • #13
                          i too made one, many yrs ago, out of tubular steel.




                          jake

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                          • #14
                            I have a setup much like this that I built a few years ago when both my sons started hockey. I used a PVC toilet flange to mount an 80mm computer fan, which blows a good stream of air through the pipes. To do it, I used a cross where hroark has a T at the bottom joint (the joint that the "legs" attach to). I think I got the fan at Frys, it was wired so that I could attach an electrical cord with a wall plug directly to it (110V AC rather than the usual 12V DC for computers). I had some pics somewhere (sent them to someone on the board, actually), and can dig them up if anyone needs them.

                            As an aside, I never glued mine together, so that we can dissasemble them and take them with us for out-of-town tourneys.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by hroark2112 View Post
                              You'd really say that if you saw the current collection...that's an old pic!!

                              This is the first useful thread you've ever posted

                              awesome build you got there....your goalie dryer ya foo'.

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